Rebecca Louise Law

Artist Rebecca Louise Law's hanging garden installations allow us to marvel at the enduring beauty of flowers.

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Rebecca Louise Law

 

Rebecca Louise Law makes eye-catching, ethereal sculptures using cascades of fresh and drying cut flowers. It’s a technique she has invented herself, harnessing both her artistic and horticultural knowledge to create artworks with all the delicacy and breathtaking natural beauty of a wild-flower meadow.

Rebecca’s big break came in 2011 when she won her first major commission, Hanging Garden, a dramatic installation made for the Floral Hall at the Royal Opera House in London. It was such a success that Rebecca, now in her thirties, hasn’t stopped since and in the past five years she has worked on installations for clients as far afield as Japan, Athens and New York. She also makes smaller sculptures encased in glass boxes and framed pieces using flowers recycled from her temporary installations. “We never throw anything away,” she laughs.

The process

The sculptures are made by tying flowers to lengths of copper wire. These are then manipulated into shape and suspended from the ceiling, allowing the flowers to dry naturally. Part of Rebecca’s skill lies in knowing how individual flowers will age and she is constantly experimenting with different species. “It’s what I like best – learning the whole journey of a species from beginning to end,” she says.

 

Natural inspiration

Rebecca takes her inspiration from nature. “I want to capture a tiny part of the awe you get when you are completely surrounded by the landscape,” she says. But as well as its grandeur, she’s also fascinated by the minutiae of nature and her sculptures are as much about the detail of individual flowers as their overall impact. And this is why she prefers her sculptures to remain in situ for as long as possible, although it may seem perverse to make permanent sculptures out of such an ephemeral material. “The longer the installation is there, the more fascinating it becomes – the colour slowly disappears but the actual structure of the flower remains,” she explains, adding, “Flowers can last forever – they are a really amazing material.” 

 

 

 

USEFUL INFORMATION
Rebecca’s studio is open every Sunday 10am-4pm; artworks are available for sale and commission. See her website for details of upcoming exhibitions. Her piece The Dairy 2016 can be viewed on guided tours of the Walled Gardens at Luton Hoo Estate in Bedfordshire (lutonhooestate.co.uk/walled-garden), every Wednesdays at 11am, 12.15pm and 2pm, from 4 May to 28 September.

Address 100 Columbia Road, London E2 7QB. Website rebeccalouiselaw.com
 

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