Garden Maintenance Supplies

Gardening Talent January issue - correction

Introducing the 'real' Tom Longridge. We used an incorrect image in January issue's Gardening Talent feature. We would like to apologise for this error.

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Tom Longridge

Introducing the 'real' Tom Longridge. We used an incorrect image in January issue's Gardening Talent feature. We would like to apologise for this error.

We used an incorrect image in January issue's Gardening Talent feature. We would like to apologise for this error. This is the 'real' Tom Longridge. The image published in the printed January issue show Sean Harkin, who is Manchester's Gardener in Residence. Sean will appear in a Gardening Talent feature later in the year.

 

Here's Tom's interview again, telling us more about his what brought him to a career in horticulture and what inspires him.

Design Course Offer with The English Gardening School

The English Gardening School is offering five readers of Gardens Illustrated a 50% discount on one of its distance learning courses.

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English Gardening School Distance Learning courses

The English Gardening School is offering five readers of Gardens Illustrated a 50% discount on one of its distance learning courses.

 

 

 

 

 

The English Gardening School is offering five readers of gardens illustrated a 50 per cent discount on one of its distance learning courses, normally priced at £495 (plus p&p).

Why is Rousham England’s most influential garden?

Designed by William Kent in the 18th century, the landscaped gardens at Rousham House in Oxfordshire continue to inspire leading designers today. We asked five designers to tell us why. Pictures by Andrew Lawson

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Rousham c. Andrew Lawson

Designed by William Kent in the 18th century, the landscaped gardens at Rousham House in Oxfordshire continue to inspire leading designers today. We asked five designers to tell us why. Pictures by Andrew Lawson

“Rousham is an intensely psychological landscape and one that provokes as many different emotional responses as there are individual visitors, and this is an important part of its extraordinary appeal; that within the confines of this relatively small plot there is scope for such myriad interpretations.”

Best birch for your garden

The textural bark of birch trees has a haunting beauty and comes in many more colours and textures than you might think. Horticulturist Christina Jones gives her recommendations. 

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Betula utilis jacquemontii c. Jason Ingram

The textural bark of birch trees has a haunting beauty and comes in many more colours and textures than you might think. Horticulturist Christina Jones gives her recommendations. 

Ask five nurserymen to name the tree that is most often requested, and undoubtedly the answer will be our native silver birch, Betula pendula. It seems entirely appropriate that as a key woodland pioneer species, this tree should abound in the nation’s gardens. But let’s be honest. The environmental value is just happenstance; fellow pioneers such as alders and hazels don’t enjoy this sort of attention. It’s really about the bark, isn’t it? That wonderfully tactile, peeling white bark.

12 great gardening reads from 2014’s books

If you're looking to top up your gardening knowledge over the winter months, take a look at our round up of gardening books that caught our eye during 2014. Great ideas for Christmas gifts and we're offering all 12 to readers at a special price.

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Books favourites 2014

If you're looking to top up your gardening knowledge over the winter months, take a look at our round up of gardening books that caught our eye during 2014. Great ideas for Christmas gifts and we're offering all 12 to readers at a special price.

 

Good gardening reads chosen from books published in 2014

Seven Flowers And How They Shaped Our World by Jennifer Potter
‘Potter’s cultural journey leads her from foot-binding in China… to the sexual rituals of the Minoans.’ From review by Ambra Edwards.
Atlantic Books, £25 – offer price £23. ISBN 978-0857891648.

 

Two pumpkin purée recipes for seasonal flavours

Use up your stored pumpkins by cooking them down slowly with a variety of aromatics – garlic, ginger, lemongrass – and use either as a purée or as a base for soup thinned with stock. Follow our two recipes

 

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Pumpkin recipes c. Sarah Young

Use up your stored pumpkins by cooking them down slowly with a variety of aromatics – garlic, ginger, lemongrass – and use either as a purée or as a base for soup thinned with stock. Follow our two recipes

 

Use either of these recipes as a purée or as a base for soup thinned with stock

 

SPICED PUMPKIN PURÉE
450g pumpkin, peeled and diced into small cubes 
1tbsp (heaped) panch phoron (see below) 
2tbsp vegetable oil
1 thumb ginger, peeled and finely grated 
1tsp amchoor (sour dried mango) powder or 2tbsp lemon juice
salt and black pepper 


How to create a green wall

From the smallest of gardens to the swankiest of city hotels, vertical planting is helping to bring walls to life and offers surprising benefits. Garden designer Annie Guilfoyle gives advice on how to go about planning your own

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Green walls c. Jason Ingram

From the smallest of gardens to the swankiest of city hotels, vertical planting is helping to bring walls to life and offers surprising benefits. Garden designer Annie Guilfoyle gives advice on how to go about planning your own

Green or living walls are becoming increasingly popular in public landscaping especially for restaurants, hotels and shops, adding texture and life to urban spaces. In principle they are an environmentally friendly idea, but, and it is a big but, this is only if you use appropriate plants and are prepared to put the correct level of maintenance in place. Only if they’re well maintained will living walls look as good as the day they were planted.

Advice on growing climbers on a wall

If you're worried about growing a climber up the wall of your house or garden wall, read our advice on best practice to ensure you never have any problems with damage to the wall's structure.

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Advice on growing climbers on walls c. Sarah Cuttle

If you're worried about growing a climber up the wall of your house or garden wall, read our advice on best practice to ensure you never have any problems with damage to the wall's structure.

Advice on growing climbers on house walls

There is a widely held belief that self-clinging climbers, in particular ivy, can cause damage to the walls of your house and garden. In fact, there is no evidence to suggest that ivy poses
a threat to sound masonry.

Collecting classic and vintage tools

Wht could be nicer than using a garden tool that has stood the test of time and is perfectly fit for purpose. Collector Louise Allen of Garden & Wood shares a few of her favourites and gives tips on starting your own collection

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Vintage gardening tools c. Andrew Montgomery

Wht could be nicer than using a garden tool that has stood the test of time and is perfectly fit for purpose. Collector Louise Allen of Garden & Wood shares a few of her favourites and gives tips on starting your own collection

Tools for the flower border

Antique tools often highlight the ingenuity of previous generations. This early 20th-century tool, known as the Little Gripper flower picker (1), both cuts and grips flowers, allowing you to pick flowers in the back of the border with ease.

Growing quince - PLUS recipe for baked quince

Quinces are perfect garden trees that bear pretty blossom in spring and heavy golden fruits in October. Once you’ve planted one, bring some zing to your autumn table by trying this delicious recipe.

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Quince c. Jason Ingram

Quinces are perfect garden trees that bear pretty blossom in spring and heavy golden fruits in October. Once you’ve planted one, bring some zing to your autumn table by trying this delicious recipe.

In the October 2011 issue of the magazine, garden writer Lia Leendertz explains why we should grow quince and how. Not only is it an attractive tree with pretty blossom but the golden fruits it bears in October are a culinary delight. Plus there's a recipe here to try.

 

Growing quince

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