Plants

Carol Klein's Plant Odysseys

In a new four part series, TV Gardener Carol Klein looks at the botanical history of four of Britain's favourite garden plants. First on the list is the rose. 

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Carol Klein

In a new four part series, TV Gardener Carol Klein looks at the botanical history of four of Britain's favourite garden plants. First on the list is the rose. 

In a new four part series for BBC Two, TV Gardener Carol Klein explores the botanical history of four favourite garden plants: the rose, the tulip, the iris and the water lily.

Throughout the series, she will trace each plant's epic journey through time, revealing how evoloution and mankind have conspired to create unique characteristics. 

Jojo Tulloh makes redcurrant jelly

For our July issue of GARDENS ILLUSTRATED, Jojo Tulloh follows a traditional recipe by cookery writer Eliza Acton (1799- 1859) from her book, Modern Cookery for Private Families and makes redcurrant jelly.    

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Redcurrant jelly

For our July issue of GARDENS ILLUSTRATED, Jojo Tulloh follows a traditional recipe by cookery writer Eliza Acton (1799- 1859) from her book, Modern Cookery for Private Families and makes redcurrant jelly.    

 Redcurrant jelly

 

The currant is a real asset in any kitchen garden. They are heavy croppers, require low maintenance and the berries can be expensive to buy in any quantity. Most importantly, the flavour of jellies, tarts, jams, cordials and puddings made with currants is superb. 

9 Fruit cages

We select 9 different fruit cages that provide a made-to-measure solution to protect your fruit and vegetables. 

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9 fruit cages

We select 9 different fruit cages that provide a made-to-measure solution to protect your fruit and vegetables. 

Attractive designs that will add character to your garden as well as protecting your fruit and vegetables. 

 

 

 

 

SEASONED OAK

Oak fruit cage, from £8,000-£9,000,

Sellick & Saxton,
sellickandsaxton.com

 

 

 

 

Easy ways to welcome wildlife into the garden

Our own gardens offer an invaluable opportunity to encourage and nuture wildlife. Here are 6 tips on how to share your garden with wildlife visitors in search of food and shelter.

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Chalupka gardens

Our own gardens offer an invaluable opportunity to encourage and nuture wildlife. Here are 6 tips on how to share your garden with wildlife visitors in search of food and shelter.

Attracting wildlife

 

Plant profile: late-flowering clematis

Garden designer and writer, Noël Kingsbury takes a fresh look at late-flowering clematis and lists 15 favourites worth looking out for.

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Late-flowering clematis

Garden designer and writer, Noël Kingsbury takes a fresh look at late-flowering clematis and lists 15 favourites worth looking out for.

These late-flowering species clematis are usually, but not always, climbing, sometimes sprawling over rocks, or forming bushes in deserts, or growing alongside grasses in meadows.

With their tiny flower heads and sometimes unusual colours, these late-flowering clematis have much of the appeal of hellebores and fritillaries, and show that when it comes to climbing flowers, bigger isn't necesarily more beautiful. 

Pots of style: A touch of glass

Head gardener Matthew Reese makes the most of unusual foliage shapes and textures of succulents in this container arrangement using a collection of vintage glass. 

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Pots of style

Head gardener Matthew Reese makes the most of unusual foliage shapes and textures of succulents in this container arrangement using a collection of vintage glass. 

I have a disjointed collection of old glasses - mostly rummers, champagne coupes and flutes, but anything really that I like the look of - which I use to create small arrangements for the centre of a lunchtime table.  glasses don't have to be antique, but older glasses have somuch more character than a mass-produced piece of modern glass. Here I've used a few smaller coloured pieces to house a selection of succulents from the greenhouse.

30 of the best climbing plants

Things are looking up - choose fom our selection of best climbing plants and add vertical interest to walls and trellises or scrambling over other plants in borders. Gardener Rory Dusoir gives his recommendations. 

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Best climbers

Things are looking up - choose fom our selection of best climbing plants and add vertical interest to walls and trellises or scrambling over other plants in borders. Gardener Rory Dusoir gives his recommendations. 

Climbing plants all share the successful strategy of relying on the support of other plants or objects to reach the sunlight. This obviates the need to invest much in producing supportive tissue, such as the wood in trees, and means climbers aren’t subject to the usual restraints on growth. By planting them we bring  a mercurial, buccaneering spirit into our gardens. Of course, luxuriant growth brings its own problems – vigour must be matched carefully to the appropriate space and abundance restrained where necessary.   

 

Plant hardiness ratings

You may have noticed in the magazine that we've started using hardiness ratings in our plant descriptions. Hardiness ratings provide a standard by which gardeners can tell which plants are likely to survive in a specific location. But what do the figures means? Here's an explanation.

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Hardiness ratings

You may have noticed in the magazine that we've started using hardiness ratings in our plant descriptions. Hardiness ratings provide a standard by which gardeners can tell which plants are likely to survive in a specific location. But what do the figures means? Here's an explanation.

We are now including details of plant hardiness ratings alongside the regular plant information in the features in the magazine. Hardiness ratings provide a standard by which gardeners can tell which plants are likely to survive in a specific location.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

British Flowers Week, 15-19 June

A celebration of cut flowers. Here are some of our favourite events taking place during British Flowers Week 2015. 

 

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British Flowers Week

A celebration of cut flowers. Here are some of our favourite events taking place during British Flowers Week 2015. 

 

British Flowers Week is the annual campaign in support of the British cut flower industry founded by New Covent Garden Flower Market in 2013. It brings together florists, growers, wholesalers and the public in a celebration of British cut flowers. The programme covers events taking place all over the U.K, including pop-up workshops, demonstrations and displays. Here, we pick out a few of our favourites. Find full details of all the events at britishflowersweek.com

Jojo Tulloh's wild strawberry jam

From our June 2015 issue, Jojo Tulloh shares her own recipe for wild strawberry jam. 

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Jojo Tulloh's wild strawberry jam c.Sarah Young

From our June 2015 issue, Jojo Tulloh shares her own recipe for wild strawberry jam. 

Wild strawberry jam

 

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