Gardens Illustrated
Gardens Illustrated picks out garden furniture, tools and lifestyle items that we think are the best and most exciting, based on independent research and careful consideration. On some occasions we earn revenue if you click the links and buy the products. But this doesn’t affect what we choose to highlight and we will never let it bias our coverage.
A selection of bird seed packs on a white background

Best bird seed, mealworms and suet balls for your garden visitors

Published: January 22, 2022 at 11:56 am

Support local wildlife and fill your garden with birdsong by stocking up on these packs of bird seed, mealworms and suet balls.

As human activity increasingly deprives animals of their natural habitats, it’s becoming more and more difficult for birds to find nutritious and filling morsels across the UK. But by setting up feeding stations around your garden, you can help support them throughout the year and make sure local wildlife flourishes. 

Advertisement

We’ve rounded up some of the highest-quality bird food packs available to buy online, with organic options as well as supplies endorsed by the RSPB and the RHS. 

Want some tips on how to attract birds into your garden? Go here.

And if you're looking for wonderful places to go birdwatching? Try here.

Best bird seed, mealworms and suet balls on the market

RSPB Nyjer Seed Wild Bird Food

RSPB Nyjer seed Wild Bird Food 900 grams

High in oil and a great source of energy, nyjer seeds are a fantastic nutritious snack for birds. They’re ideal for a wide range of different species, and could attract some of the lesser seen British birds into your garden, such as goldfinches, greenfinches and siskins.

In this pack, you’ll get 900g of nyjer seeds, which should help you keep your bird feeder topped up for a long time. You can also save up to 15% whe you buy through Amazon’s repeat delivery scheme. 

Also, 100% of the profits made from this pack will go to the RSPB to support birds and wildlife around the UK. 

RSPB Tub of 50 Suet Balls

RSPB Tub of 50 Suet Balls

Made from a mix of the RSPB’s three best-selling bird foods, these suet balls are sure to be popular with your local wildlife. They include sunflower hearts, dried mealworms and high-energy sprinkles, which combine to create an oil- and protein-rich snack with a high nutritional value.

The RSPB only uses the most sustainable and high-quality products available for both the bird food and its packaging. The bucket is both reusable and recyclable, so you can avoid sending unnecessary waste to landfill. 

Wild Bird Seed from CJ Wildlife

Bag of Wild Bird Seed CJ Wildlife

Opt for this blend of different bird foods if you prefer to buy organic produce. The ingredient list includes black sunflower seeds, kibbled maize, rolled oats and millet, all of which are grown organically.

The bird seed mix should attract a variety of different species throughout the year, as it’s full of nutritious protein. Either use it to replenish your bird feeders or scatter it on the ground for birds to enjoy. 

RHS High-Energy Sunflower Hearts

Bag of RHS High energy sunflower hearts

Sunflower hearts have a high proportion of nutritious oil, perfect for keeping your garden birds happy and healthy. Expect to find small species like robins and blue tits sampling them over the months. 

A relatively hassle-free option, these bird seeds come without husks and don’t germinate after falling on the ground, which should keep the area underneath your feeder fairly tidy.

Dried Mealworms

Bag of Dried mealworms by Waitrose Garden

Robins, wrens and woodpeckers in particular love dried mealworms, so stocking up on a new bag should help you encourage them into your garden. This type of bird food is 50% crude protein and 25% fat, and this pack has been freeze-dried for maximum nutritional value, so it’s fantastic for the local wildlife. Plus, it’s easy to store in your home. 

A high-quality product, these mealworms are prepared according to the guidelines set by the Birdcare Standards Association (BSA) and backed by the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO). 

Robin & Songbird Wild Bird No Mess Seed Mix

Robin & Songbird Wild Bird No Mess Seed Mix

For a versatile bird seed pack designed to attract smaller species, opt for this robin and songbird mix. It’s made from a healthy blend of sunflower hearts and suet pellets with high energy content. And as the seeds are cut and de-hulled, the birds shouldn’t drop shells all over your lawn. 

Scatter this mix on a bird table or over the ground, or use it to top up your hanging feeder. 

Walter Harrison's Premier Wild Bird Mix

Walter Harrison's Premier Wild Bird Mix

This bird seed pack for wild birds includes premium food and is 100% free from wheat. Among other ingredients, it includes cut maize, yellow millet and black sunflower, as well as peanut granules and soya oil. 

Like all the best mixed bird seed blends, this one can be used in various settings. Add it to your hanging feeders or place it on the ground. The pack comes in three sizes, so you can choose between the 2kg, 4kg and 12.75kg bags at the checkout. 

Johnston & Jeff Peanut Bird Feed

Bag of Johnston & Jeff Peanut Bird Feed

Peanuts are a popular type of store-bought bird food, and they attract a wide variety of different breeds, such as bramblings and sparrows. High in natural oils and fat, and packed full of calories, they’re a filling treat for our feathered garden visitors. 

These peanuts are clean and safe for birds to eat at any time of the year, just ensure that you place them in a feeder rather than leaving them whole on a table. A feeder means that small birds will peck and break them up, as whole peanuts can be difficult for them to injest.

Remember to keep your bird feeders clean

The RSPB recommend cleaning all feeders once a week to stop the spread of diseases which are causing populations of garden birds to decline.

Advertisement

For more inspiration and advice on looking after local wildlife, take a look at our buyer’s guides to bird feeders, bird boxes and bird baths. You can also learn more about planting trees to feed wild birds in our dedicated article.

Authors

Alice TufferyDigital Writer

Alice is a digital writer with a knack for tracking down the most innovative and exciting products to hit the market. Working across several of Our Media's special interest brands, she's written for publications including Countryfile, Gardens Illustrated and Science Focus. Outside of work - and lusting over homeware and gardening products - you’ll find her rambling in the great outdoors or watching an old film.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Sponsored content